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We are having to make some significant changes to the way repeat prescriptions are ordered. These changes are for safety reasons.  Please click here to further details

2017-18 seasonal flu vaccinations.  

It is that time of year again when we look to provide the seasonal flu vaccination to all eligible patients.  We aim to provide the maximum service available over 3 weekends in September and October and these clinics are now open for patients to make there appointments.  Please contact reception to make your appointment

Patients aged 65 and over and those in clinical 'at risk' groups are eligible including children in the 'at risk' groups.  Please see the following leaflet for further guidance.

2017-18 Flu Vaccination information

Attending Appointments

Appointment availability is something we monitor regularly and is always an area of interest to patients and we would like to thank all of our patients who turn up for their appointments on time. To help patients remember appointments, we offer an sms reminder service - please ask at reception for details 

We have previously agreed with the patient participation group that minimising the number of appointments lost through patients who 'did not attend' (DNA) prebooked appointments is a priority.   'DNA' appointments are expensive and effectively lost instead of being offered to someone else with a more urgent problem.  By letting us know in good time that appointments are no longer required helps us to: offer these to someone else; improve access to the GPs and nurses, and helps to reduce appointment waiting time.

Please be courteous to our staff and to your fellow patients and let us know in advance if you no longer need your prebooked appointment.  Please help us to help ALL of our patients.  Thank you

Appointments outside of normal working hours

Particularly helpful to working patients, your GPs provide a limited number of appointments outside of normal opening hours. However, we prefer not to disappoint so it's important to stress that this time is for pre-booked appointments only. We are not open for normal service at these times. Although available to all, we would respectfully encourage our non-working patients to avoid these times where possible.  Our extended surgery hours are held on Saturday mornings.

Neil Hewson

Practice Manager

 

Seasonal Flu Vaccination

Flu (also known as influenza) is a highly infectious illness caused by the flu virus. It spreads rapidly through small droplets coughed or sneezed into the air by an infected person.   For most people, flu is unpleasant but not serious. You will usually recover within a week.

Studies have shown that flu vaccines provide effective protection against the flu, although protection may not be complete and may vary between people. Protection from the vaccine gradually decreases and flu strains change over time. Therefore, new vaccines are made each year and people at risk of flu are encouraged to be vaccinated every year.

The flu vaccination is offered to people in at-risk groups. These people are at greater risk of developing serious complications if they catch flu, such as pregnant women and elderly people.

The flu vaccine- who is entitled?

A flu vaccine is available for free on the NHS for:

  • anyone over the age of 65 
  • pregnant women
  • anyone who is very overweight (with a body mass index over 40)
  • children and adults with an underlying health condition (particularly long-term heart or lung disease)
  • children and adults with weakened immune systems

An annual flu vaccine nasal spray is also now offered to healthy children aged two, three and four years old, and to children in school years one and two. 

The best time to have the vaccine is in the autumn, between September and early November. If you think you might need it, contact your local GP surgery.

You should have the flu vaccination every year so you stay protected, as the viruses that cause flu change every year.

For more information on who should have the flu vaccine and how to get it, read the sections on the flu jab for adults, the flu jab for pregnant women and the children's flu vaccine.

What to do if you have flu like symptoms

If you're otherwise fit and healthy, there's usually no need to see a doctor if you have flu-like symptoms.

The best remedy is to rest at home, keep warm and drink plenty of water to avoid dehydration. You can take paracetamol or ibuprofen to lower a high temperature and relieve aches if necessary.

Stay off work or school until you're feeling better. For most people, this will take about a week.

Read more about treating flu at home.

When to see your GP

Consider visiting your GP if:

  • you're 65 years of age or over
  • you're pregnant
  • you have a long-term medical condition – such as diabetes, heart disease, lung disease, kidney disease or a neurological disease
  • you have a weakened immune system – for example, because you're having chemotherapy or have HIV
  • you develop chest pain, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, or start coughing up blood
  • your symptoms are getting worse over time or haven't improved after a week.

In these situations, you may need medication to treat or prevent complications of flu.

 
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